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The Enemy’s Friend for Negroes-A Reply FE(1)

11 Views· 25 Dec 2021
The Renaissance
The Renaissance
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The Enemy’s Friend for Negroes-A Reply FE(1)
This is the Full Edition of our response video, the Enemy’s Friend For Negroes-A Reply(1) And we are responding to some comments we received from our last video.
Chidi Ozuzu • 7 days ago
Oh! See how the cookie crumbles. So, it's no longer Biafra but Idu. Anyway, Renai, Who exactly are your audience? Do they include the Igbos of Southeastern Nigeria? If Igbos are among your audience, then, you should know about "Idu na Ado" and "Aha Idu na Oba". You can lie as much as you want but the Igbos are beginning to wake-up to the truth.
Chidi Ozuzu • 6 days ago (edited)
@Mr Himself Alone The name Igbo denoted but did not mean a slave. Aboh kingdom (an Ika/Benin kingdom) sold slaves and there's no doubt that majority of these slaves came from the northern part of Igboland. The Aro, the Ika (I'm restricting it to Aboh), the Bonny who are to the south of Igboland saw the name as derogatory because they were never slaves.
Chidi Ozuzu • 7 days ago
@THE RENAISSANCE The word Igbo means nothing in the language of the people we today call Igbos. Some claim the word is short for Ndigbo ("ancient people") but I don't believe it's correct. The word Igbo is most likely of Yoruba origin and in that language the word means "forest". There's Ijebu-Igbo (forest of the Ijebus), Igbo-Tapa (forest of the Tapa or Nupe) etc. in Yorubaland. But the forest people the Yorubas originally called Igbos are the same people who today occupy the southeastern part of Nigeria and NOT every tribe or slave from the bight of Biafra and Benin. Europeans are not always right. I've read some European books that mistranslated some common Igbo or Yoruba words.

Chidi Ozuzu • 7 days ago
@THE RENAISSANCE The word Igbo means nothing in the language of the people we today call Igbos. Some claim the word is short for Ndigbo ("ancient people") but I don't believe it's correct. The word Igbo is most likely of Yoruba origin and in that language the word means "forest". There's Ijebu-Igbo (forest of the Ijebus), Igbo-Tapa (forest of the Tapa or Nupe) etc. in Yorubaland. But the forest people the Yorubas originally called Igbos are the same people who today occupy the southeastern part of Nigeria and NOT every tribe or slave from the bight of Biafra and Benin. Europeans are not always right. I've read some European books that mistranslated some common Igbo or Yoruba words.
Mr Himself Alone
@THE RENAISSANCE no he does not follow you unless you decieve him. Suppose you ask your father to accompany you to the market under false pretenses. You know that there are bandits that you have secretly arranged to grab him. So off the two of you go and the bandits grab him, although he fights back. It's only once they are upon you two that he realizes it's you who has betrayed him.
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REFERENCES
Benezet, A. (1767). A Caution and Warning to Great Britain and her Colonies, in a short representation of the calamitous state of the enslaved negroes in the British Dominions. Collected from various authors, etc. Philadelphia.
Ramsay, J. (1788). Objections to the Abolition of the Slave Trade, with Answers: To which are Prefixed, Strictures on a Late Publication, Intitled," Considerations on the Emancipation of Negroes, and the Abolition of the Slave Trade, by a West India Planter.". J. Phillips.
Washington, B. T. (1909). The Story of the Negro: The Rise of the Race from Slavery (Vol. 1)..
Hayford, C., & Hayford, C. (1911). Ethiopia Unbound: Studies in Race Emancipation.
Shaw, F. L. (1905). Tropical dependency: An outline of the ancient history of the Western Soudan with an account of the modern settlement of Northern Nigeria.
Orr, C. W. J. (1911). The making of northern Nigeria. Macmillan and Company, Limited.
Charles, T. W. (1860). Adventures and Observations on the West Coast of Africa. New York: Derby and Jackson.
MacQueen, J. (1840). A Geographical Survey of Africa: Its Rivers, Lakes, Mountains, Productions, States, Populations, &c. with a Map of an Entirely New Construction, to which is Prefixed a Letter to Lord John Russell Regarding the Slave Trade and the Improvement of Africa. B. Fellowes.
Smith, W. (1744). A new voyage to Guinea.

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