Film & Animation

Sample
0:31
admin
6 Views · 6 months ago

⁣Sample

The brain of the Negro-A Reply FE(1)
1:09:08
The Renaissance
31 Views · 7 months ago


The brain of the Negro-A Reply FE(1)
This is the Full Edition of our response to a comment we received on one of our previous videos from what is likely a Maroon. The comment is below
IAmDameechi @Djuana Beruk I'm Jamaican but unfortunately you are nation less if you are so called black Americans ? there is no black nation
Full video is available on Patreon.com, Odysee.com, and crystalviews.net among others. Please note that we did not restrict the full video to Patreon out of a desire to make money but because we observed that the descendants of the slave hunters flag our videos when the full videos are posted openly.
Full Videos can be found on odyssey.com and Crystalviews.net
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
You are welcome to support us at https://www.paypal.me/OurRenaissance https://bit.ly/2OxCtF8 or at https://www.patreon.com/OurRenaissance
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
REFERENCES
.Jacobs, D. (1987). The brutality of nations. Alfred a Knopf Incorporated.
Alexander, A. (1846). A history of colonization on the western coast of Africa. WS Martien.
Johnston, H. H., & Bartholomew, J. G. (1899). history of the colonization of Africa by alien races.
Pickering, C. (1850). The races of man: and their geographical distribution
Reade, W. W. (1864). Savage Africa: Being the Narrative of a Tour in Equatorial, Southwestern, and Northwestern Africa; with Notes on the Habits of the Gorilla; on the Existence of Unicorns and Tailed Men; on the Slave Trade; on the Origin, Character, and Capabilities of the Negro, and on the Future Civilization of Western Africa. Harper.
Hodgson, W. B. (1844). Notes on Northern Africa, the Sahara and Soudan: In Relation to the Ethnography, Languages, History, Political and Social Condition, of the Nations of Those Countries. Wiley and Putnam.
Long, E. (1774). The History of Jamaica: Or, General Survey of the Antient and Modern State of the Island: with Reflections on Its Situation Settlements, Inhabitants, Climate, Products, Commerce, Laws, and Government.. (Vol. 2). T. Lowndes.
Campbell, J. (1851). Negro-mania: Being an Examination of the Falsely Assumed Equality of the Various Races of Men; Demonstrated by the Investigations of Champollion, Wilkinson [and Others] Together with a Concluding Chapter, Presenting a Comparative Statement of the Condition of the Negroes in the West Indies Before and Since Emancipation. Campbell & Power.
Hertslet, E.. (1900). The map of Africa by treaty. v. ii: Nos 95 to 259 Abyssinia to Great Britain and France.
Wadström, C. B. (1789). Observations on the Slave Trade, and a Description of Some Part of the Coast of Guinea, During a Voyage, Made in 1787, and 1788,... by CB Wadstrom. James Phillips.
Goodrich, S. G. (1851). A history of all nations, from the earliest periods to the present time. Miller.
N.A(1897) Liberia Bulletin 10 issued by the American Colonization Society
Johnston, H. H. (1910). The Negro in the new world. Macmillan.
Seddall, H. (1874). The missionary history of Sierra Leone. Hatchards.
Cobb, T. R. R. (1858). An Historical Sketch of Slavery: From the Earliest Periods .

⁣Identity and Self Awareness for Negroes-A Reply FE(3)
1:00:30
The Renaissance
22 Views · 7 months ago

⁣Identity and Self Awareness for Negroes-A Reply FE(3)
This is the Full Edition of the continuation of our response video to a comment we received on one of our previous videos. The comment is below
Berphil buonfilius • 4 days ago
Dearest brother, I appreciate your lectures, as they make a lot of sense, triggering in me questions that I wouldn't have ordinarily asked.
They have helped me a lot.
But I disagree with you on the assertion that the name Igbo was given to us (because I'm an Igbo man) by the British or slave master, as what you present as a prove (that the slave masters called us Ibos) is not a prove at all. That reasoning is too low of you. That a person came to my land, met me and and later called or referred to me in whatever form (maybe in the future) by what he heard me call myself or what my neighbours called me, does not mean that he gave me the name. That is absolutely illogical! The slave masters only called the people (ndị Ịgbo) what the people called themselves. That that is not the case for other groups like the Yorubas and some others does not make the claim false. Yes I do not have a proof here (but there is) that we were called by that name before the arrival of the British or the whites in our land. But it's just the same as you who do not have or is yet to provide a cogent prove that we never bore that name before the arrival of ndị ọcha.
And more over you have mentioned severally that ibo (Igbo) was used to refer to every negro from the bight of Biafra. Does the fact that I and you know that the majority of the slaves were Igbos not make it clear that the slave masters called every one of their slave from that territory i(g)bo because majority of them were Igbos?
If it is not so, i.e., if it is as you claim that the name was given by the slave traders to the entirety of the different ethnic groups shipped through the bight of Biafra or Bonny, why then did the name i(gbo) stock ONLY with the igbo people till today, and not with they entire group of slaves of different ethnic origine from the bight of Biafra?....
Full video is available on Patreon.com, Odysee.com, and crystalviews.net among others. Please note that we did not restrict the full video to Patreon out of a desire to make money but because we observed that the descendants of the slave hunters flag our videos when the full videos are posted openly.
Full Videos can be found on odyssey.com and Crystalviews.net
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
You are welcome to support us at https://www.paypal.me/OurRenaissance https://bit.ly/2OxCtF8 or at https://www.patreon.com/OurRenaissance
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
REFERENCES
.Ratzel, F. (1898). The history of mankind (Vol. 3). Macmillan and Company, Limited.
Jacobs, D. (1987). The brutality of nations. Alfred a Knopf Incorporated.
N.A(1855) The palace and park:Its natural history and its portrait Gallery together with a description of Pompeian Court
Edwards, B. (1801). The history, civil and commercial, of the British colonies in the West Indies: In 2 vol.: Illustr. with maps (Vol. 2). Stockdale.
Equiano, O. (1794). Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself.
Davis, W. J. (1904). The Nineteenth Century Token Coinage of Great Britain... Dryden Press.
Alexander, A. (1846). A history of colonization on the western coast of Africa. WS Martien.
Bowen, J. W. E. (Ed.). (1896). Africa and the American Negro. Gammon Theological Seminary.
Falconbridge, A. (1788). An Account of the Slave Trade on the Coast of Africa, by Alexander Falconbridge. James Phillips.
Pinkerton, J. (1802). Modern geography. Vol II
Byrd, A. X. (2006). Eboe, Country, Nation, and Gustavus Vassa’s “Interesting Narrative.” The William and Mary Quarterly, 63(1), 123–148.
Tucker, S. (1853). Abbeokuta: Or, Sunrise Within the Tropics: an Outline of the Origin and Progress of the Yoruba Mission. James Nisbet and Company.
.Burton, R. F. (1863). Wanderings in West Africa from Liverpool to Fernando Po (Vol. 1). Tinsley brothers.
Ross, A. (1658). Pansebeia: Or, a View of All Religions in the World: with the Several Church-governments from the Creation, Till These Times. Also Discovery of All Known Heresies in All Ages and Places: and Choise Observations and Reflections Throughout the Whole... By Alexander Ross. To which is Annexed, the Lives, Actions, and Ends of Certain Notorious Hereticks. With Their Effigies in Copper-plates. John Williams, at the sign of crown, in St. Paul's Church-yard.
Quadrefages, A(1875) The Natural History of Man

Biafra Freedom and the Slave Master FE(4)
59:00
The Renaissance
12 Views · 8 months ago


Biafra Freedom and the Slave Master FE(4)
This is the Full Edition of the continuation of our video about a Freedom Seeking group(I.P.O.B) in what was Negroland and Guinea looking for Freedom from the Colonial and slavery structures of the Slave master and his accomplices.
However, as you would expect in every Negro gathering, there must be saboteurs, disunity, snitching etc. In this case, the group called Indigenous People of Biafra(IPOB) is currently looking for freedom from the colonial and Slave masters and the Yoke of One Nigeria. As expected, the slave master connived with his slave hunting accomplices to abduct the leader of the Group and then infiltrated another group called Directorate of State(D.O.S).
In 2015 the same leader was arrested, and detained by the Slave master and his accomplices for two years without trial. Following his arrest in 2015, the leadership group called D.O.S was found to have compromised and the then Deputy Dissolved the DOS. The slave master and his accomplices then went back to the drawing board and this time got the deputy and afterwards the DOS. He then went ahead to kidnap the leader while having the D.O.S under him.
This video continues to show that the D.O.S in IPOB is compromised and now being used by the slave master and his accomplices to destroy the movement from within.
Full video is available on Patreon.com, Odysee.com, and crystalviews.net among others.
Please note that we did not restrict the full video to Patreon out of a desire to make money but because we observed that the descendants of the slave hunters flag our videos when the full videos are posted openly.
Full Videos can be found on odyssey.com and Crystalviews.net
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
You are welcome to support us at https://www.paypal.me/OurRenaissance https://bit.ly/2OxCtF8 or at https://www.patreon.com/OurRenaissance
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
REFERENCES
Goldie, H. (1890). Calabar and Its Mission. Oliphant, Anderson & Ferrier.
Brown, W. W. (1849). The narrative of William W. Brown, an American slave.
Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Select Committee on the whole house (1789). Minutes of Evidence Taken Before the Honourable House of Commons, in a Committee of the Whole House, to Whom it was Referred to Consider of the circumstances of the Slave Trade; Complained of in the Several Petitions which were presented to the House in the last Session of Parliament, relative to the State of the African Slave Trade
Walker, F. D. (1926). Africa and her Peoples. Edinburgh House Press.
Great Britain Parliament(1789) Reports of the Lords of the Committee of Council Appointed for the Consideration of All Matters relating to Trade and Foreign Plantations
Lugard, F. D. (1922). Dual mandate in British tropical Africa.
Twelvetrees, H. (1863). The story of the life of John Anderson, the Fugitive Slave

Corona-Krise Prof
14:17
admin
23 Views · 11 months ago

Testing

Jacob’s Voice and Esau’s Body Code for Negroes-FE(3)
55:01
The Renaissance
29 Views · 12 months ago


Jacob’s Voice and Esau’s Body Code for Negroes-FE(3)
This is the Full Edition of our video- Jacob’s Voice and Esau’s Body Code for Negroes-(3) It is a continuation of our series on how the slave master hides behind his slave hunting partners to mete out evil against the Negroes.
Like the case of the Biblical Eve and the Serpent, the ugly image sticks with the serpent who bears the brunt of the incident a lot more than the invisible Satan. Today, why the slave master is the architect and sponsor of the atrocities against the Negroes, he hides behind his slave hunting partners while the Negroes, who resemble the slave hunters bear the brunt of their activities.
The video simply tries to show that although the voice may be Jacob's, the body is that of Esau as coded in the slave masters’ book.
Full video is available on Patreon and at Odysee.com, and crystalviews.net among others.
Please note that we did not restrict the full video to Patreon out of a desire to make money but because we observed that the descendants of the slave hunters flag our videos when the full videos are posted openly.
Full Videos can be found on odyssey.com and Crystalviews.net
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
You are welcome to support us at https://www.paypal.me/OurRenaissance https://bit.ly/2OxCtF8 or at https://www.patreon.com/OurRenaissance
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
REFERENCES
Blake, W. O. (1860). The History of Slavery and the Slave Trade, Ancient and Modern. H. Miller.
Reindorf, C. C. (1895). History of the Gold Coast and Asante, Based on Traditions and Historical Facts: Comprising a Period of More than Three Centuries from about 1500 to 1860. The author.
Crawford, G. W. (1865). Prince hall and his followers: being a monograph on the legitimacy of Negro masonry. Ams PressInc.
Moister, W. (1866). Memorials of Missionary Labours in Western Africa, the West Indies, and at the Cape of Good Hope: With Historical and Descriptive Observations, Illustrative of Natural Scenery, the Progress of Civilization, and the General Results of the Missionary Enterprise. W. Nichols.

⁣ Negro Slavery today _FE(2)
1:10:42
The Renaissance
65 Views · 1 year ago


Negro Slavery today _FE(2)
This is the Full version of this video where we continue to examine how the current state of the Negroes and how the slave master and his slave hunting partners are working to enslave the Negroes and as they say, forever.
It also shows how the slave master is able to set up the Negroes against themselves in one way or another.
Full video is available on Patreon and at Odysee.com, and crystalviews.net among others.
Please note that we did not restrict the full video to Patreon out of a desire to make money but because we observed that the descendants of the slave hunters flag our videos when the full videos are posted openly.
Full Videos can be found on odyssey.com and Crystalviews.net
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
You are welcome to support us at https://www.paypal.me/OurRenaissance https://bit.ly/2OxCtF8 or at https://www.patreon.com/OurRenaissance
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
********************************************************************************** ‌
We do not hold the copyright to these videos but use them based on fair use.
REFERENCES
Orr, C. W. J. (1911). The making of northern Nigeria. Macmillan and Company, Limited.
Beaufoy, H. (1789). The speech of Mr. Beaufoy,Tuesday, the 18th June, 1788, in a Committee of the whole House, on a Bill for Regulating the Conveyance of Negroes From African to the West-Indies To which are added Observations on the Evidence adduced against the Bill
Blumhardt, C. F. (1799). Christian missions: or a manual of missionary geography and history: Edited by C. Barth. religions Tract Society.
Wilson, J. L. (1856). Western Africa: Its history, condition, and prospects. New York: Harper.
Mill, H. R. (Ed.). (1899). The International Geography: By Seventy Authors. New York: D. Appleton.

⁣ Slavery and Institutions for Negroes-A Reply_FE(1)
1:03:16
The Renaissance
38 Views · 1 year ago


Slavery and Institutions for Negroes-A Reply_FE(1)

Slavery and Institutions for Negroes-A Reply is the Full version of our series that seeks to show the relationship between Negro Slavery and the institutions established in what was Negroland and Guinea. It also further seeks to expose who and who were behind the slave trade and how the slave master and his slave hunting partners are still working together today.
The Full Version of this video will be available on Patreon and on Odysee.com, Crystalviews.net, and Rumble.com
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For those that have supported us, we say thank you
You are welcome to support us at https://www.paypal.me/OurRenaissance https://bit.ly/2OxCtF8 or at https://www.patreon.com/OurRenaissance
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
********************************************************************************** ‌
REFERENCES‌ ‌
Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. (1792). The Debate on a Motion for the Abolition of the Slave-trade, in the House of Commons on Monday and Tuesday, April 18 and 19, 1791, Reported in Detail. James Phillips.
Forbes, F. F(1851) Dahomey and the Dahomians
Saint-Rémy, J. (1850). Vie de Toussaint-L'Ouverture. Moquet, Librairie-editeur.
Prescott, J. H(1857) The American Encyclopedia of History
Cunningham, J. (1868). The Quakers from Their Origin Till the Present Time: An International History. John Menzies & Company.

⁣ Asking how, what and why for Negroes_FE(2)
1:04:35
The Renaissance
40 Views · 2 years ago


Asking how, what and why for Negroes_FE(2)

Asking how, what and why for Negroes_FE(2) is the full version of our new series to get the Negroes to ask relevant questions about their history, who they are, who they were and what could be happening to them.It is aimed at getting the Negroes to stop believing but instead start knowing.
Please note that aside from Youtube censorship we were on Patreon to reduce the distraction from the descendants of the slave hunters as they appear to watch our videos more than the Negroes for whom the videos are made.
The Full Versions of the Video will be available on the following platforms
www.lbry.tv
www.arisetube.com
www.crystalviews.net
For those that have supported us, we say thank you
You are welcome to support us at https://www.paypal.me/OurRenaissance https://bit.ly/2OxCtF8 or at https://www.patreon.com/OurRenaissance
For those that have supported us, we say thank you

‌ ‌
REFERENCES‌ ‌

Brown, R. (1896). The story of Africa and its explorers (Vol. 4).
Du Ryer, A. (1649). L'Alcoran de Mahomet.
Malte-Brun, C. (1829). Universal Geography, Or, A Description of All Parts of the World, on a New Plan: According to the Great Natural Divisions of the Globe: Accompanied with Analytical, Synoptical, and Elementary Tables: Improved by the Addition of the Most Recent Information (Vol. 4). J. Laval and SF Bradford.
Hodgson, W. B. (1843). The Foulahs of Central Africa and the African Slave Trade.
Ross, A. (1696). Pansebia: A View of All Religions in the World. Longon:
Hazzledine, G. D. (1904). The white man in Nigeria. E. Arnold.
Clarke, R. F. (1889). Cardinal Lavigerie and the African Slave Trade... Longmans.
Platt, S.H (1859) The martyrs and the fugitive; or, A narrative of the captivity, sufferings, and death of an African family, and the slavery and escape of their son
Higgins, G. (1829). An apology for the life & character of the celebrated prophet of Arabia, called Mohamed, or the Illustrious. R. Hunter.
Barbot, J. 1732. A description of the coasts of North and South Guinea. A collection of voyages and travels.
Burdon, J. A. (1904). The Fulani Emirates of Northern Nigeria. The Geographical Journal, 24(6), 636-651.

Universe Size Comparison 3D
5:08
admin
84 Views · 2 years ago

⁣Universe Size Comparison 3D




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